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zumwalt and what i think is important about his life. because, sure, he is the father of the modern navy, but there's so much more to him and so much more to the lessons that i think i'm able to portray in my book. bud zumwalt is remembered as a trailblazer who reformed the navy, and he was a champion of the men and women who served in it. that's a given. he was the iconoclastic admiral who brought a navy drifting towards the shores back into safety. into the channels of the 20th sent -- century. and nothing would ever be the same again. as bill clinton and admiral mullen say at the back of my book on the dust jacket blurbs, the things that he did as a reformer will never be undone. and i'm not talking about whether they are bell bottoms or trousers or side burns, those things can be changed. but the way he reformed the social policies and made the navy response to the contemporary needs of society and what he did with respect to vis-a-vis the soviets during the period of the cold war and the strategic arms limitations and his role there. these are things that have left a mark in history
lost their sons. when i called rocky to right, a navy football player, linebacker type. he wasn't sure how he was going to find his voice either but since we were classmates and company mates i said rocky, you were a casualty evacuation pilot and you saved over 150 marines, soldiers, iraqis and three deployments. you honor jen harris, another academy graduate. you honored ronnie winchester when you make the story. let's find your voice. we wrote this book to give a podium to people who are too humble to speak about service, who do their job day in and day out nobly and don't have a bestseller and don't go out into "the new york times" and write their stories. they are too proud and too prideful. so i cajoled rocky as i had this vision of leading the stories together. i knew what i wanted. what i wanted battlefield bullets, feeling the pressure of combat and they're in this book that i also wanted to have universal attributes of partnership and diplomacy that we saw from 9/11 and till now in 2012. here's something from rockies story. i experienced several close calls while flying during
of world war ii the royal navy was the world's biggest navy. also was irrelevant. it was powerful but they didn't understand aircraft carriers, they underestimated submarines and they thought battleships were still central to maritime operation. the royal navy does nothing worth remembering in world war ii. is a total drain on the british. when mitt romney was talking about the size of the navy during one of the debate, i thought you want to read paul kennedy year. just because we have a big powerful navy doesn't mean it is the right navy. what you want of a relevant force? april and force down the road is going to look very different than it does today. but i think the place to begin with pretty severe budget cuts that make people stop and think. >> we have had so many great questions and i know we can go all night but we only have time for one more and tom will talk to a lot of you individually as well. you, sir. >> perfect segue. i'm a navy captain of the naval academy. also co-founder of a forum to study warfare and wondering if you could comment or everything what you said ab
, so i can join navy federal too. he's getting a great rate - so now he can drive himself to laser tag. it's a real sport. no, its not. 4 million members. 4 million stories. navy federal credit union. >>> gridlock in washington may seem like business as usual today but it hasn't always been that way. throughout the 1960's and '70s during one of the most turn you leapt periods in american history bipartisan senates drove sweeping reform to civil rights and social programs while challenging the executive branch over the vietnam war and ultimately moving to impeach president nixon over the watergate scandal. our next guest ira shapiro is the author of "the last great senate:courage and statesmanship in tames of crisis." welcome to the program. >> nice to be here. >> why do you call it the last great senate? >> well, because from the early 'sick through about 1980 we had a senate that was in the forefront of everything that was going on in the country, and accomplished a great deal. the senate of humphrey, muskee, baker, ted kennedy, many other great americans. and we haven't had a senate
used our navy federal cashrewards card to fly in reinforcements. nana. hoooaah! alright nana! 4 million members. 4 million stories. navy federal credit union. >>> one of the most important tools in iraq and afghanistan have been army and marine snipers who have become integral to virtually every operation. part scout, part guardian angel, part avenger, these sharp shooters are in such high demand the military is increasing numbers as quickly as possible. arch a dozen years of war, snipers are complaining their equipment is not good enough. dan lamothe recently returned from being im bedded with marine snipers in afghanistan. thanks for joining us. >> thanks for having me. >> you reported scout snipers are frustrated with their capabilities of ammunition. what's the problem? >> they took me out for a journalist a pretty unique mission. kind of an overnight sniper mission. and their gripe is they have several rifles to choose from, and that they're sort of capability gaps in between them. 50 caliber rifle, the m-107 reaches out to 2,000-meter, 2,000 yards but not nearly as accurate. and t
until our pane arrived in memphis that morning to an airport to an air force base to a navy base that had more landings than i think o'hare airport had that morning. it was busy. the kennedy administration did not want to lose out on this one. anyway, when you're appointed to be a security officer in such a situation, you keep notes. they're blase, they're telephone numbers, names of people who today we call persons of interest. people who didn't look like students. every night i had to report to the fbi for anyone that might have come into oxford and checked into a hotel that didn't look like he belonged there. so i kept those notes, and then i looked at them over the years. i started this book ten years ago. and i started talking to people that were in my unit, and they provided me with anecdotes. and i looked over old newspaper sections, i looked over old magazines. started piecing things together. ken burns said you look at a photograph long enough, the photograph comes to life. the person that has a life before that snapshot and has a life after that, and you begin to, again
have profound effect on the security, even though they're not nations, they don't have armies, navies and air forces. >> and after a decade of fighting terrorism, the u.s. has adapted. military planners have turned away from major ground wars in favor of more nimble special operations. >> there's an old adage that, "this war is not like the last war, this war is not like the next war, this war is like this war." the point being that they're all different. and the enemy has a brain, the enemy adapts and adjusts to whatever the united states does. >> there's been a tension in the u.s. military which is particularly important today between preparing for the big wars, like wwii or, or the gulf war and preparing for counter-insurgencies against lesser threats, guerilla groups and terrorists. as we had to face whether it was the vietcong in vietnam of al-qaeda in iraq or the taliban. >> i actually think that in the 21st century large land war is going to become more and more rare. nimble special forces types operations or relatively brief deployments of small numbers of troops will be much
.s. continue to dominate the western pacific, the navy and air force to the same degree that it did throughout the cold war in the post cold war the philippines and australia in particular to bear some of the burden. that's what i mean by an empire. i'm going to let the audience discover for your questions with the major conclusion of the book is the latest want to ask you before we turn it over what you -- you are walking away from america's historical a central role of the superpower, and you are talking about inevitable, necessary, a decline, and how would you respond. they want the american influence to extend long into the decade that they cannot do that bearing the same level of burden. of vladimir putin against china at the same time that what countries like vietnam and the philippines drag us into a war with china, over the sea is so azoff plater balancing triet in any case, the u.s. has so much oil deposits in texas, louisiana, oklahoma or other places i can name but we are doing to be -- because of energy reserves we are going to be a significant power for decades to come in any case
. to have play somewhere next to 5 years it might be oakland. hunger bowl 8 days away at at&t park. navy against arizona state. couple teams with very different styles. >> question mark for navy and giant exclamation point for for mike mcintire an spartan of san jose statement our mantra find way to get san francisco. >> shut out by san jose state on september 29. navy found themselves at 1 and 3. sure spot on the craft fight hunger bowl fading. that's when head coach made a change at the most important position on the fiel field. >> keenan has been quarterback since that time. but that was a good football team. but kind of a turning point for us. we are at the low blow so we had to find our self quickly and fortunately we did big part is no. 19. >>reporter: keenan reynold the right call. finish at 8 and 4. arizona state also had the up and down. after starting the season 5 and 1 they dropped 4 in a row to pack 12 rival all rank in the top 10 at 1 point in the season. sun devil able to right the ship with back-to-back victory to finish at 7 and 5. this is a match up of confli
a sense of what relationships washington has with india and what would be priorities for both india navy? [inaudible] how is it going to help? >> let me start with your last question first. as far as the indian ocean organization that you related to that we are, we're not a part of but we are invited as an observer to it, but in general, throughout the into pacific region, first, you have to understand the breadth and scope of that region. is well over half the people in the world living in that region. all the major economies are in that region, including ours. seven of the 10 largest armies in that region. you can put all the comments in the world in the pacific ocean, put all of them in the pacific ocean and still have room for another africa, another candidate, another united states, another mexico. that's just in the pacific. the indian ocean is vast as will fix we have this really large, very dynamic, can't even call it a region. it's half the world, where you have historical ties between countries, bilateral, multilateral, and you have this, there is no one security organization t
the deputy commander of the people's liberation army navy, and the commander of the ambassadors japanese maritime self-defense force, a euphemism for the japanese navy. it was at a time when the island was leading on cnn and bbc. i thought as i was sitting between two them there's an opportunity for a canadian to do something extraordinary from an naval diplomatic perspective and put this thing to bed. [laughter] >> how did that go? >> not too well, not too well. [laughter] which is my point. i spoke with the chinese admirals interpreter. i spoke with admiral commander in english, a great conversation. but never was the bridge build or even considered. and i think one of the key issues here, with respect to china as they emerge, as a real leading nation is the ability to build bridges, to communicate to build strategic trust and cooperation, to enable every forum, the east asian summit, asian, and others, all bilateral come multilateral relationships in order to keep the volume as well as possible spent last year i had the privilege of interviewing henry kissinger about his book on china
-- he was trying -- a lot of brilliant people. so-called jedi knights, bunch of army-navy marine air force young guys who came up with a strategy to not batter directly away at the enemy force. remember that iraqi army. fourth largest army in the world. it had thousands and thousands of tanks and artillery pieces. and if you look at our military history, frequently what we have had, you know, world war ii, the italian theater, korea, korean peninsula, just battering away directly at an enemy. schwarzkopf, when he unveiled that plan, i was a division commander, sitting in a room with admirals and generals waiting to hear what we were going to do and schwarzkopf personally briefed it when he pulled the cover off of the map, we gasped and said -- by god, this is it. it is a giant wheeling motion to the west to cut them off and instead of directly attack the enemy. magnificent soldier. >> something always strikes me about general schwarzkopf especially read being him now is that you know, after vietnam, the military went through a pretty dark time. not necessarily beloved by the public l
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who clutched pouches they made from the scrotums of dead vietnamese. the navy patched up their heads in action. the haight beckoned across the choppy cold waters of the bay. on christmas eve went strolling in the hippie haven he'd rented figures reform might magazine. he wasn't looking for sex, but for mystical camaraderie. it's a harder connection to find in the states. as he walked on haight streak of us have ratty looking speed freaks for fun of them, hustling anyone who went by. when a past, jitterbug scratch, trying to pull in peer she broke away, but the navy men's high-end lst fix them with a look at data backed up the woman. after vietnam mozilla became not sure to mccarthy was only enhanced by the acid. 20 yards past, mccarthy heard a loud scuffle from the sharp crack of a gunshot. as he spun around, the young man stumbled past shutting i got a shot me. the kid who ventured into the haight from a suburb to score drugs have been shot through the five p. it's not an interaction, durable for shoulder for his frantic girlfriend was reading it her father seabird. mccarthy's intro
from alaska good up, beverly moore, 81-year-old korean war navy veteran. beverly was there because the majority of her modest income comes from social security. she wanted to know how this proposal will strengthen that lifeline for her and thousands of alaskans. in fact, one in nine alaskans receive social security. with my state's population of those 65 and older expanding rapidly, social security will continue to play a key role in supplementing a decent living. if social security was not there for the elderly in alaska, a fifth of them would live below poverty. it's vital for our state. it's vital for all our states and for this whole country. mr. president, i have no illusions that this bill is not going to pass in the final weeks of the 112th congress, but i wanted to get it into the mix, i wanted to make sure that people get the bigger point, and again i would say to my presiding officer -- and he says as well and i know my friend here from oregon is on the floor also. as we talk about the deficit, it has taken center stage right now, we want to highlight one very clear thing
at the army navy club here in washington, d.c., and it is a great pleasure to have with us today some of our real national treasures. and certainly lieutenant colonel, promotable trantor is among them -- j. b. vowell is among them. the tenant colonel vowell commander province called task force no slack which i think is really a phenomenal italian name, and also think it was a phenomenal italian -- [inaudible] in some of those difficult -- and one of the most difficult environments. lieutenant colonel vowell ripeness at stanford university doing his work college fellowship. [inaudible] >> cooperation spent all right. center for international security and cooperation. want to get your stanford bosses to let you come out here today. very, very happy. he's working on a thesis right now on afghanistan after 2014. but, of course, i got to know him while he was deployed in afghanistan, and got to visit his battalion. first, while he was out where we met, joe holiday at the time the no slack, and now the study of war, then again in february of 2011 at a commanders conference held by the colonel who
. not until our planes arrived in memphis that next morning to an airport, an air force base or a navy base that had more landings i think that o'hare airport had that morning. it was busy. kennedy administration did not want to lose out on this one. anyway, when you are pointed pointed to pointed to be security officers which in its situation keep notes. you keep notes and telephone numbers, license plates, names of people or today we call them persons of interest. people who didn't look like students. every night i had to report to the fbi for anyone who might've come into -- checked into a hotel who didn't look like he belongs there. so i kept those notes and i looked at them over the years. i started this book 10 years ago. i started talking to people who were in my unit and they provided me with anecdotes. i looked over old newspapers, looked over old magazines. started piecing things together. ken burns says, look at a photograph on and off. the photograph comes to life. the person that had the life before the snapshot will have a life after it and you begin to again, put things toget
. ike played a real, key role in that, didn't he not? >> admiral -- [inaudible] navy admiral who said during world war ii, what was his line? we learned to burn them scientifically, you know, was in favor of modern or warfare. and he wanted to use tactical nuclear weapons as did john foster dulles, as did richard nixon when the french were losing. they felt this was the time to use tactical nuclear weapons to sort of rescue the situation. ike listened to that, rejected that advice, never really tipped his hand what he was thinking. this is one of these moments when he had to decide because the french position was, obviously, precarious and losing. and ike made the decision, one, not to get involved, to send b troops in. he famously said the jungle will consume the army by divisions, so he did not want to put in ground troops, and he thought about but rejected the idea of using tactical nuclear weapons. okay? back to you. >> was there any effort after stalin died early in the presidency to attempt to reset the relationship? >> yes. >> you mention add two-year interval. >> this is an im
so i joined the naval rotc and then was a navy attorney for four years and -- >> was that during vietnam? >> it was during vietnam, that's why i was being drafted actually. within a week of going to the peace corps i received my 18 classification for notice of physical, so guess what i and future had in store for me. after i got out of the navy i was a federal prosecutor in los angeles, u.s. attorney's office. prosecutor standard cases, bank robberies, drug cases, didn't think about it much. in the the petting a unit prosecuting fraud against the government, fha, va, that sort of thing. after that was in the private practice of law, business litigation for five years of appointed to the bench, so i was on the bench for 25 years as a judge and now i'm retired and i'm running, as you say, for office. >> what court were you a judge? >> superior court in orange county california, or the state court and over 25 years, pretty much did everything. and as a part of that, you know, and to see turning low-level drug offenders through the system for no good purpose, and eventually in fact i
of the joint chiefs, navy admiral said in world war ii, what was the line? we learned to burn them scientifically, you know, was in favor of modern warfare, and he wanted to use tactical nuclear weapons as did john foster dulles as well as richard nixon when the french were losing at the end. they felt this was the time to use tactical weapons to try to rescue the situation. ike listened to that. rejected that advice. never really tipped his hand at what he was thinking. this is one of the moments when he had to decide because the french's position was procare yows and losing, and he made the decision, one, not to get involved sending ground troops in saying the jungle will come soup the army by division so he did not want to put in ground troops, and he thought about, but rejected the idea of using tactical nuclear weapons. okay? back there. >> any effort after stalin died early in the presidency to attempt to reset the relationship? you mentioned the two year interval. >> this is an important moment. sal lin, of course, used to talk about the inevidentability of the conflict with
in the navy. fay will be missed by her two sisters in michigan plus many her neez live niece lives in -- memorial services were held on november 17. ms. bingham will be greatly missed. thank you to debby, from human services network for alerting us to the passing of ms. bingham. also i have a couple of other wanted to say that coming up on the imperative agenda is a resolution in support of small business saturday which is the saturday two days after thanksgiving. and the resolution -- the imperative agenda resolution declares november 24, 2012 the citizen after thanksgiving holiday as small business holiday to celebrate increasing awareness of locally owned small business in san francisco. small businesses have less than 100 employees represent 98% of employ approximately 50% of employees in the private sector. small businesses also contribute to 52% of the total sales of taxes paid by businesses in the city. it's also important to note for every $100 spent locally owned independent businesses generate $68 iní%( z5 local economic act, and that compares to only $43 by the national
of the united states navy, honor, courage and commitment. on december 9, twelve, pet -- 2012, the petty officer rescued ar kidnapped american doctor from the taliban near kabul. a veteran of the iraq war and a decorated navy seal, the petty officer died during critical injuries sustained on the successful mission to save the life of dr. joseph. a grateful nation grieves for him and his family. he strived for excellence, madam speaker. as a norwin high school student, peers described him as diligent and driven, always aware he would someday serve his country. he was a dedicated student and a wrestler. he consistently challenged himself to pursue excellence in everything he did. such dedication to one's country was also carried on by him. that is truly remarkable but it's also expected of a navy seal. among many commodations, he was awarded the bronze star, the joint service commendation medal and the marine corps commendation for service during combat. and now the purple heart. the bible reminds us that there is no greater love than to lay down one's life for one's friend. through his incredible
army unit the navy is assigned to the marines and we are mixed up and we work together. cited a couple two hours but a couple of normal day's issue were called you take apart a car bomb and we had a stretch of a lot of car bombs every day. of those 50 we managed to take apart one of them. 49 detonated. and then it is like scsi you figure out what it was, who the target was there and collect evidence day by day and put it in a report and you did that every day. the mission is if we cannot stop the car bomb or the idb then everybody comes home all 30 of us went together and we will come back. my whole unit came back together. i was very lucky. at home i had a completely average experience. and i am not comfortable speaking for any veteran. everybody fought there own war and reacted differently but my experience is i had trouble thinking about anything other than grief, the fear has what kind of person m i that came, as much as this year of being in any surrounding. i knew i was safe in my head but not in my gut but you come home and i got out of the military. i elevated eight years. your
will hit across the board. every department in the army, navy, air force, marines and coast guard and they will be steep. of the $1.2 trillion in total spending cuts over nine years, $492 billion come from the pentagon. defense analysts say the impact on the military would be serious. >> the pentagon and the department are already in financial trouble. because there has already been $480 billion cut. to take another cut is devastating. >> it will make it channeling for the military to maintain the troops. equipment and preparedness. the larger defense industry also will be hit. >> severe budget cuts could put the natural security at risk if the company that make the f-35 fighter or artillery pieces don't have the money to keep going. >> my district would be adversely affected and defense spending cut by $8 billion. >> how did we get to this place? >> in budget battle, the 2011 spending cut put in as unthinkable trigger to force the lawmakers to find a way to cut spending. so far, they haven't found a way here we are. >> to make it unpalatable, they insist it comes out of the defen
helicopters, navy s.e.a.l.s and a translator and dog named cairo took off from juloll bad, afghanistan. the mission, to kill the world's most wanted man. osama bin laden. >> the death of bin laden marks the most significant achievement to date in our nation's effort to defeat al qaeda. >> most have heard the incredible details of the bin laden compound raid, but little has been revealed about the intense, month's long deliberation that led to the final decision to act. so, how was the decision made? who w how did they weigh the options? tonight we'll ask the man tasked by the president to analyze the assessments and run the decision making process to act in a sense as gatekeeper of this monumental decision. i sat down with tom donilon in the secretary of war suite in the eisenhower executive office building. when you come into the white house, has the trail for osama bin laden gone cold? >> when we came into office in the beginning of 2009, the trail had gone cold. we really hadn't had a good case to his whereabouts since he was in tora bora in 2001. >> what did the president say at th
they made their tough decisions. >>> at 11:00 p.m. on may 1st, 2011, two black hawk helicopters, 23 navy s.e.a.l.s, a translator and a dog named cairo took off from jalalabad, afghanistan. the mission, to kill the world's most wanted man, osama bin laden. >> death of bin laden marks the most significant achievement to date in our nation's effort to defeat al qaeda. >> most have heard the incredible details of the bin laden compound raid, but little has been revealed about the intense, months' long deliberation that led to the final decision to act. so how was the decision made? who was told? how did they weigh the options? tonight we will ask the man tasked by the president to synthesize the intelligence, analyze the assessments, and run the decision-making process, to act in a sense as gatekeeper of this monumental decision. i sat down with national security adviser tom donilon in the secretary of war suite of the eisenhower executive office building. when you come into the white house, has the trail for osama bin laden gone cold? >> when we came into office at the beginning of 2009, the
. miller: i thank the sponsor of this legislation. she is the wife of a navy retired commander and is a strong advocate for veterans in washington and around this country and thanks to my good friend, the new ranking member mike michaud in helping to move this legislation to the floor. he has been an active and valuable member of our committee since his first days in congress and he himself has proven himself time and time again a strong voice for americans' veterans. i urge all of my colleagues to join me in supporting h.r. 3197. before i ask -- giving away the balance of my time. i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend all remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. miller: i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 3197. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended -- the gentleman from maine. mr. michaud: i object to the vote on the grounds that a quorum is not present and make a point of order that a quorum i
in the united states navy. these are two men who didn't mince any words. they didn't hedge. there was candid and direct and i think this report is a quality report. the state department can take pride in it. the country is well served for the process put in place. secretary clinton said she would do this in david e. completely unfurnished appraisal and that's exactly what it is and i think she and the administration deserve credit for doing what was required here and really going to great lengths to make this sure is a very professional presentation. so tomorrow we will hear from the department on how they are proceeding forward. but i think the most important step is the report itself in the presentation later today. >> what administrative actions are taken inside the state department as a >> what administrative actions are taken inside the state department as a result of this report? >> everything the report has suggested has been embraced by the department and more. secretary clinton has sent out additional measures she think can contribute to advancing the interests set out in the report
days," but they did not specify where or how. in response, the u.s. navy said none of its unmanned aerial vehicles-- u.a.v.'s-- are missing. and in washington, white house spokesman jay carney raised doubts about tehran's statements. we have no evidence that the iranian claims you cite are true. i'd refer you to the pentagon's comments this morning for details about this particular type of u.a.v., but again we have no evidence that the iranian claims are true. >> sreenivasan: a year ago, iran did manage to down a c.i.a. drone that apparently crossed the border from afghanistan. and last month, the u.s. military said another drone came under fire by iran over the persian gulf. it was undamaged. in afghanistan, a bomb blast has killed two nato troops in the country's south. the alliance says the attack happened yesterday. it did not provide the nationalities of those killed. so far this year at least 384 international troops have been killed in afghanistan. most of them have been americans. in economic news, the u.s. housing market showed more signs of recovery in a new report by the
exercising together our navies on things like humanitarian assistance. and i think there is room for that kind of cooperation and one of the things that we agreed while i was in china was that we would exchange younger people in our militaries, like from our military academies to spend time in each other's country and at each other's military schools. i think there is a lot to be gained by this. i think the more interaction we can have with these guys at a military and political level to complement the economic relationship will be all the better. >> rose: getting back to the middle east and other parts of the world and also in asia because of the presence of terrorism in asia as we have seen, you know, are we winning the battle of ideas with all of those groups now splinter groups, groups that emerged out of al qaeda so that they are less appealing and so that the effort to eliminate them is going better? >> i am not sure that i would say we are winning the battle of ideas, but ideas that we hate are losing. whatever, whatever the outcome of the changes in the middle east, in eg
and law school and immediately entered the navy where he received the purple heart for his service in the pacific theater. the immediacy of his experience has made him a man that was dedicated to making every feasible effort to achieve peace. after he was discharged at the end of the war key worked at newsweek magazine, and in that job came into contact with joseph kennedy sr., who asked him to manage the merchandise in chicago. during the chicago years, he married the daughter eunice in 1953 and chaired the chicago school board in the catholic interracial council as a supporter of desegregation of the city schools. shriver's prominence in the commercial and social life of the state soon lead to interest on the part of the political leaders to nominate him for governor of illinois. but by then, his brother-in-law, john kennedy, was running for president. shriver served us kennedy's chair for illinois and also head of the campaign civil rights division. in that capacity, leading a campaign, he convinced kennedy to telephone caruthers scott king in the matter of his imprisonment on t
. the russians have a key port on the mediterranean that their navy bases out of in syria. they're certainly worried if the rebels win or when the rebels win look like now is a possibility that they will lose that port and this diplomatic maneuver may be a chance to save a little bit of face and influence in that new syria. patti ann? patti ann: leland, what other powers are sort of participating behind the scenes in this proxy war? >> reporter: lots going on here. this is for all intent and purpose as war between iran, saudi arabia and other gulf states. iran supports the, iran supports the regime. saudi arabia, the other gulf states are supporting the rebels. they're willing to supply money and weapons for as long as both sides are willing to kill each other. they have little interest in a peace deal and a lot to lose by losing or their side inside syria losing. this will be a very different situation in libya. in libya, qaddafi fell, everything was over. now looks like the syrian civil war could go on for years. right now, patti ann, about 45,000 people killed there sectarian violence con
their air force, but their navy is being told to get out of the war. >> reporter: norman schwarzkopf was a west point graduate who spent his whole career in the army. he was a war hero in vietnam, where he earned three silver stars, three bronze stars and two purple hearts. he returned from the persian gulf a national hero. president george h.w. bush presented him the medal of freedom. president bush issued a statement calling norman schwarzkopf a true american patriot and one of the great military leaders of his generation. in retirement, schwarzkopf declined calls to run for office, devoting himself to public speaking and charity work. he leaves his wife and three children. norman schwarzkopf was 78. chuck sivertsen, abc news, new york. >> he was known for being opinionated and brave, the kind of guy you want on your side. >> there's no question, when you think about the first persian gulf war, that was the defining war for millions of americans because there had been a break, and then america went back to war. he became a household name. >> stormin' norman is hard to forget. that'
across a more dispersed geography. this past february the navy and marine corps conducted their first large-scale amphibious exercise in more than ten years. in march the army conducted its first exercise in its new decisive action training environment that emphasizes combined arms maneuver against a combination of irregular and near-peer conventional opponents. the second element of our defense strategy is to maintain our force projection where we need it; in the middle east and in the asia pacific region. the asia-pacific region is, obviously, an area of growing importance to our economy and our security. and the middle east, obviously, represents continuing threats to our security as well. even after the withdrawal of troops from iraq, we have maintained a substantial military presence in the middle east in order to deter aggression, respond to crisis, insure regional stability in the face of historic unrest and the continuing threats from iran. last week i visited some of our troops based in kuwait, part of a robust gulf posture that includes roughly 50,000 troops, dozens of ships
. the navy will also honor veteran ray emory. he has made it his mission to identify more than 600 unknown service members remained. he says he remembers being on the deck of the u.s.s. honolulu like it was yesterday. >> when i got there i had the cover off one of the 50 caliber machine guns. the other was about halfway off and a torpedo went by, the torpedo heading for ship row. i thought at the time that this is really a good mock thing like that. i pull the cover off the rest of the way and about that time another torpedo came by and i saw the big red ball and i realized it was the japanese who were attacking pearl harbor. heather: he has helped id nine service members and has the names of one hundred more men that he believes are identifiable. because of his work more than 300 gravestones at the national cemetery in hawaii have been relabeled with the names of the diseased. jon: new information on the earthquake in japan we told you about earlier. minimal damage and minor injuries reported now. the 7.3 magnitude quake striking off the northeastern coast triggering a small tsunami in th
to andrews air force base. that brought home the impact of our nation's loss. glenn was a former navy seal, also, from my home state, and i talked a couple times with his family. woods was a former seal, shawn smith, and air force veteran, all people for whom service to country was their life so today we, again, say thank you to all of them, to the fallen and the families. they all gave to our nation and we're grateful beyond words for their service and their sack -- sacrifice. from the very beginning of the benghazi events, every member of this committee has shared with the president and secretary clinton our determination to get all the facts about what happened and why in benghazi. we submitted many questions to the state department to be incorporated into this investigation, and we're very pleased that they have been. we've had a number of classified briefings for our members, and yesterday, the committee heard from ambassador tom pickerring and admiral mike mulling, -- mullen. they were frank, and they are two of america's most distinguished and capable public servants. ambassador pic
there were two people protecting the ambassador. they were navy seals but they were in the country for a different reason. i think it is appropriate the people associated with this resign and even, you know, in the report they claim -- they put some of the blame on the ambassador for not asking enough. but we know he did ask clearly for more protection and expressed a lot of concerns about what was going on on the ground. in terms of hillary clinton, you know, it's perfectly plausible this did not reach her level. she is the secretary of state. i don't know this kind of request would make it all the way up to her. but she should still testify and give her perspective on that. megyn: she can say that, it was boswell and lamb if that's how it was. megyn: no american official was found guilty of neglect or dereliction of duty. how can you get to no one is guilty of any neglect in this situation? >> it's incredible. it doesn't single out a single person for blame here and it doesn't identify any disciplinary action to be taken either. if everybody is responsible as this report seems to
this happen by standing side by side as one team, as one joint facility, army, navy, air force. you have become one of the best medical teams in the world. and by raising expectations, by making clear that there is always hope, that good things can happen by advancing training, by increasing responsibility, our corpsmen, our medics are now capable of delivering life-saving medical care right there on the battlefield. this is the new standard of medical care, and i'm very proud to say that it is the most advanced in the world. a real revolution has taken place in battlefield medicine. it has truly been a revolution and in our ability to care for the most serious combat injuries. we have also seen that a higher survival rate can result in a new set of complex injuries when our soldiers return home. and you're responding to that challenge as well. here at the center of healing, the center of miracles, you have treated diseases that we've never seen before on our soil. you perform life-saving surgeries that are the first of their kind. and you've developed the most advanced prosthetics in th
the mid-november time frame or so, announcing today that along with huntingtonengles, it has won a navy submarine contract. and those are secure even if the defense department undergoes sequestration. interesting deal being made there. >> taking a look at some of the biggest names that are among the biggest losers. traders have told us, if you're in the money on a lot of these names, why not take some money off gap for instance, masco. names like that are related to housing and retail. >> and speaking of retail, coors, third straight day of losses for shares of coors. a big winner so far this year. yesterday, citigroup had cautious comments from itses, saying in some cases, there are massive discounts on kors handbags. so questions on the pricing in the margins on kors. but this thing went public on the new york stock exchange, and it has had a monster run. 78% over the past year. and for a lot of these big gainers, there could be some tax gain selling also. sell it, reestablish your cost basis, go back and buy it. >> and of course, melissa, those retail sales numbers, we've got some pr
and what price. so when you say the gap, old navy and victoria's secret were standouts this season what brought the shoppers in? was there a hot item this season? >> not one hot item per se, gap has been seeing a real turn around. i think the stores look better, the merchandise has been improved. the marketing has been improved. old navy as well, a surprise. victoria's secret, again, the merchandise is fantastic, lingerie a clear winner at holiday at all times, so, i mean, again, if you look at your channel checks, those stores were generally per rehn y'ally crowded. i tend to agree with craig johnson, apple looked empty for what apple stores have been in the past. retailers like pandora generally crowded, charms a good buy. so you know, i think people were extremely cautious in what they bought this year and were very strategic and went in bought what they wanted and left. >> the gap, we just showed chat of the gap, monster 60% the past year, a turn around story, largely because at some point in time, they weren't getting their merchandise quite right you weren't hitting the fashion no
with him. as we say in the navy, jay, well done. may you and your family have fair wind and good seas. i yield back. mr. woodall: i thank the gentleman. mr. speaker, at this time it's my great pleasure to yield to the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. thompson. mr. thompson: i thank the gentleman from georgia for hosting this hour. and an opportunity to recognize and thank a good friend, jay pearson, who started his work in the u.s. house of representatives in 1978, in the office of the general clerk under then majority leader john rhodes. where he learned the intricacies of the house and legislative procedures while keeping official minutes in this chamber. in 1979 he began working in the republican cloakroom where he remained for seven years before beginning a new position as floor assistance it -- floor assistant to the republican leader in 1986. since then jay has served as floor assistant to three speakers of the house, including newt gingrich, dennis hastert and the current speaker, john boehner. the career that has spanned over 35 years, jay has served as an invaluable role for so
. glen daugherty was a former navy seal. -- glenn doherty was a former navy seal. tyrone woods was another seal. sean smith, an air force veteran. we want to say thank you to all of them, to the fallen, and their families. they all gave it to the nation, and we are grateful beyond words for their service and sacrifice. from the very beginning of the benghazi event, every member of this committee has shared with the president and secretary clinton our determination to get all the facts about what happened and why. resubmitted many questions to the state department to be incorporated into this investigation, and we are very pleased that they have been. we -- we have had a number of classified briefings, and yesterday, the committee heard from an pastor john pickering and admiral mike mullen. we heard them deliver a frank and comprehensive set of findings to the review board. admiral mollen and an pastor pickering are two of american's most distinguished and capable public servant -- servants. -- admiraland mulle -- admiral mullen and ambassador pickering article of americans most
and solemn ceremony brought home the impact of our nation's loss. glenn doherty was a former navy seal. he was also from my home state, and i talked a couple times with his family. and tyrone woods was a former seal. sean smith, an air force veteran. all people for whom service to country was their life. and so today we again say thank you to all of them, to the fallen and the families. they all gave to our nation, and we're grateful beyond words for their service and their sacrifice. from the very beginning of the benghazi events, every member of this committee has shared with the president and secretary clinton our determine craigs to get all the fact -- our determination to get all the facts about what happened and why in benghazi. we submitted many questions to the state department to be incorporated into this investigation, and we're very pleased that they have been. we've had a number of classified briefings for our members, and yesterday the committee heard from ambassador tom pickering and admiral mike mullen. we heard them deliver a very frank and comprehensive set of findings of
the remains back one last time to andrews air force base. glenn doherty was a former navy seal. tyrone woods was another seal. sean smith, an air force veteran. we want to say thank you to all of them, to the fallen, and their families. they all gave to the nation, and we are grateful beyond words for their service and sacrifice. from the very beginning of the benghazi event, every member of this committee has shared with the president and secretary clinton our determination to get all the facts about what happened and why. we submitted many questions to the state department to be incorporated into this investigation, and we are very pleased that they have been. we have had a number of classified briefings, and yesterday, the committee heard from ambassador john pickering and admiral mike mullen. we heard them deliver a frank and comprehensive set of findings to the review board. admiral mullen and ambassador pickering are two of america's most distinguished and capable public servants. i want to thank them for their extraordinary service to our country. the report pulls no punches. it tackl
say the navy chose the best person they could have for that job, and dick lugar became known not only for his hard work but his intellectual prowess. senator lugar, at the young age of 35, became mayor, serving two terms. there is no question that dick lugar is recognized as one of the most influential and visionary mayors that indiana has ever seen, and i would submit that the country has ever seen. i was working full time and attending indiana law school at night, and that did not leave much time for us to enjoy the amenities of indianapolis, but, frankly, there were very few to enjoy it at that particular time. it was then that our newly- elected mayor began a transformation. it is now one of the most attractive and livable cities in america. he worked with the assembly. he extended the boundaries of the city and provided comments, is essential services more efficiently, -- and provided common, essentials services more efficiently -- essential services more efficiently. it became a model for the country. moving from the 26 largest city to one of the nation's dozen largest cities. w
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